DNC VICE CHAIR SET TO SPEAK AT KING-KENNEDY DINNER

(LITTLE ROCK) – Vice Chair of the Democratic National Committee and New York State Assemblyman of the 79th district in the Bronx, Michael Blake will serve as the keynote speaker for the 14th Annual King-Kennedy Dinner.

“Assemblyman Blake is a dynamic, youthful trailblazer in the Democratic Party and we are grateful to have him in Arkansas,” said Arkansas Democratic Black Caucus President Ted Davis. “He played a dominate role in the election and in the administration of President Barack Obama. Assemblyman Blake’s focus is on strengthening minority-women-owned businesses to have greater access to capital, contracting and opportunities, so they hire community residents and empower our neighborhoods as a whole.  He believes as do many of us that economic development, education and equality are key elements to changing the status quo,” added Davis.

The son of Jamaican immigrants, Blake graduated from Northwestern University and pursued a career in journalism before entering the political arena in 2006 with  the “Yes We Can” training program. He then managed three winning state legislative races in Michigan, became President Obama’s 2008 Iowa caucus constituency vote director, and served in eight additional states, including Michigan, where his team won all seven races as part of their Coordinated campaign. Blake later served as White House associate director of public engagement and deputy associate director of the office of intergovernmental affairs. In 2012 Blake was national deputy operation vote director for President Obama.

The Arkansas Democratic Black Caucus will host its annual dinner on Saturday, April 14, 2018 at the Metroplex Event Center in Little Rock, AR. A VIP reception begins at 5:30 p.m. with the dinner following at 7 p.m. The event was established in 2005 to honor and recognize outstanding individuals who have made significant contributions to their communities.  This year eight Arkansans who have positively impacted the state are set to be honored.

Blake sits on the board of the My Brother’s Keeper Alliance, is an honorary national co-chair of the New Leaders Council and in 2016 became the first sitting elected official to serve as a fellow at the Harvard University Institute of Politics.

Tickets are $100 and can be purchased at http://ardemocraticblackcaucus.org/king-kennedy-dinner/

ARKANSAS DEMOCRATIC BLACK CAUCUS ANNOUNCES 2018 KING-KENNEDY DINNER HONOREES

(LITTLE ROCK) – Eight Arkansans who have positively impacted the state are set to be honored by the Arkansas Democratic Black Caucus at the 14th Annual King-Kennedy Dinner on Saturday, April 14, 2018 at the Metroplex Event Center, 10800 Colonel Glenn Road in Little Rock, AR. A VIP reception begins at 5:30 p.m. with the dinner following at 7 p.m.

This year’s honorees include:

Irma Hunter Brown Women’s Leadership Award
Kandi N. Hughes, Esq., Little Rock
Attorney at Southwest Power Pool

Thomas E. Patterson Education Award
Lloyd Jackson, Hot Springs
Deputy Superintendent of the Hot Springs School District

Annie Abrams Community Service Award
Michael F. Johninson Sr., Little Rock
Founder and Executive Director of Compassion In Action

Jerry Jewel Government Leadership Award
The Late John M. Lewellen, Little Rock
Former State Representative

Calvin King Economic Development Award
Dr. Karama Neal, Little Rock
Chief Operating Officer of Southern Bancorp Community Partners

President’s Award
Cynthia Sims, Pine Bluff
Education Counselor at University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff

Charolette Tidwell, Ft. Smith
Founder of Antioch for Youth and Family

President’s Award – Lifetime Achievement
Carol Willis, McGhee
Political Aide to President Bill Clinton

Tickets are $100 and can be purchased at http://ardemocraticblackcaucus.org/king-kennedy-dinner/.

About the Arkansas Democratic Black Caucus

The Arkansas Democratic Black Caucus (ADBC) was established in 1982 as an extension of the Democratic Party of Arkansas. It provides a vehicle, within the Democratic Party of Arkansas, to address the concerns of African-Americans. The objective of this organization is to achieve proportionate representation of African-American Democratic public officials, elected or appointed in Arkansas; foster election of and monitor the performance of all elected officials and disseminate information to the African-American community through effective communication.

Honorable Judge Marion A. Humphrey, Keynote Speaker, 13th Annual King Kennedy Dinner

(LITTLE ROCK) – The Honorable Judge Marion A. Humphrey, pastor of Allison Presbyterian Church in Little Rock, AR, will serve as the keynote speaker for the 13th Annual King Kennedy Dinner.

The Arkansas Democratic Black Caucus (ADBC) will host its annual dinner on Friday, February 17th, 2017, at the Clinton Presidential Center in Little Rock, AR. The dinner and award ceremony will begin at 7p.m. The event was established in 2005 to honor and recognize outstanding individuals who have made significant contributions to their communities and the state of Arkansas.

“We are thrilled to have Judge Humphrey as our keynote speaker this year,” said Darrell Stephens, president of the ADBC. “He is dynamic and motivating. I know that he will deliver a thought provoking address that will touch on where we are, where we’re headed, and the steps needed for rebuilding within our Democratic Party.”

In addition to serving as the pastor of Allison Presbyterian Church, Humphrey is a retired circuit court judge for Pulaski and Prairie Counties. Humphrey was awarded the 2016 King Kennedy Dr. Jerry Jewel Government Leadership Award for all of his accomplishments in the state’s local government. He received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey; a Master of Divinity degree from Harvard Divinity School, Cambridge, Massachusetts; and a Juris Doctorate degree from the University of Arkansas School of Law, Fayetteville, Arkansas.

Some of his accomplishments include serving as a municipal judge, working in private practice, and serving as the Little Rock Assistant City Attorney, and Arkansas Assistant Attorney General. Humphrey is also a member of the Arkansas Judicial Council, the Arkansas Bar Association, the Pulaski County Bar Association, and the W. Harold Flowers Law Society, and is a life member of both the National Bar Association and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. He is president of the Christian Ministerial Alliance in Little Rock and formerly served as chaplain of the Judicial Council of the National Bar Association, member of the Arkansas Supreme Court Committee on Criminal Practice and a recipient of the Paul Harris Fellow of International Rotary.

About the Arkansas Democratic Black Caucus

The Arkansas Democratic Black Caucus (ADBC) was established in 1982 as an extension of the Democratic Party of Arkansas. It provides a vehicle, within the Democratic Party of Arkansas, to address the concerns of African Americans. The objective of this organization is to achieve proportionate representation of African American Democratic public officials, elected or appointed in Arkansas; foster election of and monitor the performance of all elected officials and disseminate information to the African American community through effective communication.

To learn more about the Arkansas Democratic Black Caucus or ticket/sponsorship information, contact Darrell Stephens at 501-218-6957, Lynette Vinson at 501-650-6062, Sanci Richardson at 501-563-8401 or visit the website at www.ardemocraticblackcaucus.org.

ARKANSAS DEMOCRATIC BLACK CAUCUS ANNOUNCES 2017 KING KENNEDY DINNER HONOREES

(LITTLE ROCK) – In celebration of Black History Month, The Arkansas Democratic Black Caucus (ADBC) will host its 13th Annual King Kennedy Dinner on Friday, Feb.17th, 2017 at the Clinton Presidential Center in Little Rock, AR. The dinner will begin at 7 p.m. The event was established in 2005 to honor and recognize outstanding individuals who have made significant contributions to their communities and the state of Arkansas.

“Once again, we are very excited to celebrate the 13th annual King Kennedy Dinner and to pay tribute to deserving individuals here across the state of Arkansas,” said Darrell Stephens, president of ADBC.

“This year, I wanted to change things up a bit and add two new awards for deserving individuals in our state. Our current state of affairs has taken a drastic turn and now more than ever is the time that we need to ban together, and create grass-roots organizing to effectively move forward as a people and create change.”

The annual King-Kennedy Dinner held during Black History Month, is a major fund-raiser for the Arkansas Democratic Black Caucus. All of the proceeds will go towards helping identify and helping to elect good African Americans to office, and to help educate the African American community on voting and political issues.

“We, the Arkansas Democratic Black Caucus, believe that change occurs when we hold true to the democratic values, of practicing love, compassion, and justice for all,” said President Stephens.

This year’s honorees include:

Irma Hunter Brown Women’s Leadership Award
Nicole Hart, Little Rock, AR

Thomas E. Patterson Education Award
James McCoy, Little Rock, AR

Annie Abrams Community Service Award
Ethan Dunbar, Lewisville, AR

Dr.Jerry Jewel Government Leadership Award
Mayor Shirley Washington, Pine Bluff, AR

Calvin King Economic Development Award
Christopher A. Masingill, Little Rock, AR

Dr. Martin L. King Jr. Faith Leadership Award
Rev. Roy Jones, Jr., Little Rock, AR

John F. Kennedy Compassion Award
Rev. Dr. Christoph Keller, III, Little Rock, AR

President’s Award
*Special Presentation*

President’s Award – Lifetime Achievement
Alan Hughes, Little Rock, AR

To learn more about the Arkansas Democratic Black Caucus or ticket/sponsorship information, contact Darrell Stephens at 501-218-6957, Sanci Richardson at 501-563-8401 or Lynette Vinson at 501-650-6062. You may view sponsorship and ticket information here.

 

About the Arkansas Democratic Black Caucus

The Arkansas Democratic Black Caucus (ADBC) was established in 1982 as an extension of the Democratic Party of Arkansas. It provides a vehicle, within the Democratic Party of Arkansas, to address the concerns of African-Americans. The objective of this organization is to achieve proportionate representation of African-American Democratic public officials, elected or appointed in Arkansas; foster election of and monitor the performance of all elected officials and disseminate information to the African-American community through effective communication.

REMINDER! MEETING THIS SATURDAY!

REMINDER! MEETING THIS SATURDAY!
Join us this Saturday, November 14th, at 11:30a.m.

Bethel AME Church
815 West 16th St, LR, AR
We will start promptly at 11:30a.m

We are asking that ALL ADBC Members make a special effort to come out and attend!

Also, if you signed up to volunteer with the Christmas Gala, we will have a brief 20 min meeting following the general meeting!

We look forward to seeing YOU!

Sincerely,
Darrell Stephens, President-Arkansas Democratic Black Caucus

John Marshall Robinson

John Marshall Robinson
John Marshall Robinson

John Marshall Robinson was a prominent physician, civic leader, and co-founder and president of the Arkansas Negro Democratic Association (ANDA). As a physician, Robinson performed pioneering medical surgery and was involved with a number of medical institutions and organizations in Little Rock (Pulaski County). As a politician, Robinson was the main voice in the state demanding equal black participation in the Arkansas Democratic Party between 1928 and 1952.

Born on July 31, 1879, in Pickens, Mississippi, John Robinson was one of eight children of Isabell Marshall and Amos G. Robinson. Robinson attended Rust College in Holly Springs, Mississippi, and graduated from Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee, in 1904. While in Nashville, Robinson met and married India Cox. Robinson’s only child, John Marshall Robinson Jr., was born in 1903. Before completing his studies at Meharry, Robinson passed the Arkansas Board of Medical Examiners exam. He practiced medicine in Newport (Jackson County) from 1901 to 1904. In 1904, Robinson completed his medical studies at Knoxville Medical College in Tennessee. He then returned to Newport, and, in April 1905, he co-founded the Pulaski County Medical, Dental and Pharmaceutical Association with Little Rock physician John G. Thornton. In 1906, Robinson opened a medical practice at 7th and Main streets in Little Rock. With no hospitals for African Americans in the city, he was forced to conduct medical procedures, including surgery, in his office.

In February 1911, Robinson was confronted by the suitor of a woman with whom he was having an affair. Robinson shot and killed the man. He received a five-year sentence for self-defense manslaughter, although he was released less than two years later for carrying out pioneering surgery while incarcerated when he removed a bullet from a fellow inmate’s heart. Following the 1944 elections, Governor Homer Adkins granted him a full pardon.

Robinson resumed his medical career, and, in 1918, he and three other black physicians founded Bush Memorial Hospital in Little Rock, named after black Republican leader John E. Bush. The same year, Robinson became a founding member of the Little Rock branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). In 1919, he began work as assistant surgeon at the Missouri-Pacific Hospital. In 1921, Robinson’s wife died; he married Myrna Hayes of Camden (Ouachita County) in 1923. From 1927 to 1929, Robinson served as Bush Memorial Hospital’s chief surgeon. Financial difficulties led to the closure of the hospital in 1929. He then became chief surgeon of the Royal Circle of Friends Hospital from 1929 to 1933. In 1933, he became chief surgeon at Lena Jordan Hospital, a post he retained for more than twenty years.

In 1928, Robinson co-founded and became president of ANDA to fight the exclusion of black people from voting in Arkansas’s Democratic Party primary elections. Robinson and ANDA petitioned the courts for redress in 1928 and won a temporary restraining order, but the decision was overturned. Robinson and ANDA then sued for the right to vote in Robinson v. Holman (1930). The Arkansas Supreme Court upheld the use of all-white primaries, and the U.S. Supreme Court refused to hear the case on appeal. Only in 1944 did the Court finally rule, in the Texas case of Smith v. Allwright, that the use of all-white primary elections to disfranchise black voters was unconstitutional, though it continued in Arkansas in an altered fashion until 1950.

Soon after the changes, Robinson announced his retirement from politics. In 1953, he was one of the first black doctors admitted to the integrated Pulaski County Medical Society. Robinson was a member of the National Medical Association and was published in the National Medical Journal. He was a staff member of the Arkansas Baptist Medical CenterSt. Vincent Infirmary, and Memorial Hospital in Little Rock. In 1960, he was awarded a Certificate of Merit from the Arkansas Medical Society. Robinson was also extensively involved in civic organizations. In 1949, he won Little Rock’s (Negro) Man of the Year Award.